History and Art that is being currently produced in the wider region of the eastern Mediterranean has, among other things, been the subject of my personal interest and research activity throughout my studies all these years. A geo-cultural interface itself, Greece is located at a crucial point, between three continents, linking the West with the East. The southeast Mediterranean basin has always been a place of creative exchange and cultural fermentation.The Mediterranean mixture– seen as a challenge in time– has established a state of vital fluidity, a free trade area of cultures, languages, ethics and customs. The Mediterranean (Media Terrae) constitutes at the same time the South of Europe and the North of Africa, the West of the East and the eastern edge of the world (Finis Terrae). In our present historical era, we are witnessing a generalized state of forced exchange, a condition of violence that necessitates the constant movement and displacement of populations not for the purpose of cultural production, but with view to promote the subjugation of the populations involved to a common measure, that of Economy. The core question, then, that runs through the backbone of my ongoing research may be formulated as follows: in what ways might all those diverse cultures –that were once dovetailed with one another, constituting a common civilization– be re-invented in their plurality/unity? The (eventually, not so) metaphorical scheme that fuels my artistic approach and practice in relation to the geocultural phenomenon of the “Mediterranean basin” comes from the realm of sound and not from that of image. The Mediterranean basin could, thus, be described as a geological formation, more precisely a sonorous cavity of multiple resonances: the basin seen as source and at the same time as effect of resonances.An echo chamber in which sound reverberates, generating multiple nuances of feedback, return, boundness and offering. Like an interplay of mirrors in which every act or object is multiplied and even distorted. Sound appears to be a credible metaphor of the real. What, then, is the sound of this basin? How would the sound of that geocultural reality sound? Wouldn’t it be an audio spacetime where highly diversified means of transition link a type of material to another, a space characterized by a varied gradation of mutations, interplays, overlaps, cross-fading, sudden shifts and hidden junction points? The compositions reflect upon the perception of a sonic environment with noises, history, rapid changes and memory. Concentrating on the details of the path, zooming in on the micro-cosmos of heterogeneous environments, multiple and migrating sounds that carry the historical memory of contacts within the Mediterranean, while resonating the teeming grids and networks of the basin and echoing the myths of this complex cultural area as accursed or sacred. The sound pieces contain narratives based on field recordings, experiences and reflections from the journey that rose to over 46,000 km coastline length.